Just Eat Courier Claims

If you've worked for Just Eat in the past 10 weeks, you could be eligible to claim thousands in compensation.

Why You Can Claim

Currently, Just Eat couriers are classified as self-employed independent contractors under their contracts. However, our partner law firm strongly argue that, based on the actual nature of their work, these couriers should be recognised as employees or workers rather than self-employed contractors.

By classifying couriers as employees or workers, they become entitled to essential rights and protections, including holiday pay and the National Minimum Wage. 

How Much Could You Claim?

Successful completion of the claim could result in couriers being entitled to significant compensation, potentially amounting to thousands of pounds. The exact compensation will be calculated based on relevant data from Just Eat, as well as your financial documents, such as tax returns/accounts, bank statements, and payslips. No documents are needed at the sign-up stage.

What You'll Be Compensated For

The claim aims to secure compensation for backdated holiday pay, shortfalls to the National Minimum Wage, and the lack of employment contracts provided by Just Eat.

Employment Contract

Employees have the right to a clear employment contract that outlines the terms and conditions of their work. If you haven't been provided with a formal employment contract, you may be entitled to claim.

Backpay for unpaid holiday

Employees have legal protection against unlawful deductions from their wages. If you have experienced unauthorised deductions that have affected your earnings, you may be eligible to join the claim.

National Minimum Wage

Employees are entitled to receive at least the National Minimum Wage for the work they perform. If you believe you haven't been adequately compensated for your services, you may have a valid claim.

Who Is Eligible To Claim?

If you have delivered for Just Eat as part of their “independent contractor” arrangement in England, Scotland, or Wales within the last 10 weeks, you may be eligible to participate in the claim.

Joining the claim is a simple and quick process. Checking your eligibility does not require any documents.

Employment claims involve multiple stages and can often take several years to reach a resolution. Where possible, we’ll seek compensation for the losses you have experienced throughout your entire tenure as a Just Eat courier. Consequently, the amount owed to you as compensation will continuously grow as the claim advances, as long as you remain employed by Just Eat.

FAQs

Most frequent questions and answers

If successful, Just Eat couriers may be entitled to significant compensation, potentially amounting to thousands of pounds. We are claiming backpay for unpaid holiday, compensation for receiving less than the National Minimum Wage, and compensation for the failure to provide employment contracts. Your compensation will be calculated based on various sources of information, including data obtained from Just Eat, as well as your financial documents such as tax returns/accounts, bank statements, and payslips. Please note that our legal fees, which amount to 25% plus VAT, will be deducted from your compensation if your claim is successful.

In most cases, you will not be required to pay Just Eat’s legal fees if you lose, unless there are exceptional circumstances such as engaging in vexatious or unreasonable behavior or ignoring a Tribunal order.

Yes, you can still join the claim if you have delivered for Just Eat within the last 10 weeks. If you haven’t delivered for Just Eat in the last 10 weeks, we recommend registering your details on the sign-up page, as you may be eligible to join the claim in the future if you deliver for Just Eat again.

Just Eat should not penalize couriers for bringing a legal claim. As an employee or worker, you have legal protection against mistreatment by Just Eat due to asserting your rights. If Just Eat deactivates your account or alters your work conditions because of your legal claim, you may be entitled to additional compensation.

If the Employment Tribunal determines that couriers should be classified as employees, it is possible that HMRC (Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs) may require Just Eat to deduct income tax and National Insurance contributions from previous earnings via PAYE. If HMRC takes action, it is more likely that any shortfall in tax will be paid by Just Eat rather than individual couriers. The risk of couriers being asked to pay any tax shortfall directly is low. For specific advice regarding your individual tax circumstances, we recommend consulting with an accountant or tax adviser.

Leaving Just Eat will not affect your ability to continue with your claim. If you stop delivering for Just Eat or if your account is deactivated, please inform our team via email, stating the date of your last drive for Just Eat.

There is no reason why you should have less flexibility as an employee or worker compared to being a self-employed independent contractor. Just Eat should ensure that couriers have the opportunity to take time off and receive paid holiday as any employee or worker would. Additionally, Just Eat needs to pay couriers a rate that ensures they receive at least the National Minimum Wage, considering working time and expenses. You do not need a fixed working pattern or a set number of working hours for Just Eat to calculate your holiday pay and the National Minimum Wage.

No, you do not need to provide any documents to join the claim initially. If necessary, we may request documents to support your claim or assist in calculating your compensation at a later stage. We will contact you for